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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
they are unlikely to go as far as withdrawing embassadors. -- embassadors -- ambassadors. >> rwanda has rejected a report that says it was involved in the rebel goma capture rebel in congo -- the democratic republic of congo. the drc is now back in control -- control. in the uk, starbucks says it will start paying corporation tax. the company has nearly 1/3 of the uk coffee shop market, but has only paid the tax once in the past 15 years. starbucks has been stung by public criticism of its actions. you're watching "bbc world news america." still to come on tonight's program, nearly 25 years after a deadly gas attack, one kurdish town is still trying to identify the scores of people who died. to japan now, where the authorities are trying to figure out how tunnel collapsed on sunday, killing at least nine people. huge concrete slabs in the tunnel smashed on to cars. that started a fire on the main route from tokyo to central japan. we report now on that story. >> only this morning, the mangled wreckage of three vehicles was brought -- early this morning, the mangled wreckage of three vehicles was
brief. this working and training local communities for self protection was done in rwanda against the fdlr. i am not so sure about doing this in the congo. it is attractive to me, but i guess i would say it depends on the community. i would say the key here is to engage and embrace the congolese government at the most senior level, but not just the presidential level, which is why i keep talking about some kind of by national commission. then you can start penetrating those ministries which have the responsibility, even bring governors over so that you can do at the provincial level. i guess i think that the real heavy lift here is more on the diplomatic side, and working very carefully with the congolese government, which is essentially isolated and does not have much contact with our officials i remember about the army that was not paid -- officials. >> i remember about an army that was not paid. that says an awful lot about the nature and character of society. i think we all agree that if you have a security solution, but does not sit with the situation on the ground, it will s
department that makes a cameo appearance in the book, quoted asking, if we call what happened in rwanda genocide, how does it play for us in what were then the mid term elections of 1994. well, there's a pattern here as we see. one is a reluctance to have america be engaged in certain issues, and the second one is politicizing foreign policy issues because they might hurt the president's political stance. >> paul: and you want a secretary of state, if you're-- well, the american people want a secretary of state who is some more independent judgment and not thinking so much about the politics, is that the point? >> that would be one thing that you would look for in the secretary of state. >> paul: sorry for stating the obvious. >> the national interests and not the president's mid term when it comes to iran and north koreas of the world. >> paul: is that enough to stop, mary the president from getting the secretary of state that he wants and with john kerry mentioned the senator from massachusetts as the alternative to susan rice, would he be any better. >> i'm surprised that the preside
genocide in rwanda in 1994. these guys are blamed for sweeping into villages, raping hundreds of women, chopping apart children, massacre of people. that's who the government is teaming up with. the rebels are accused of pulling people from huts in the middle of the night, shooting them in the head, so congo is this really, it's like this caldron of abuse on a scale that's unlike just about anywhere else in the world. i cover a number of these conflicts in africa. i cover somalia, darfur. just about everywhere else things are changing or getting a bit better in some cases. congo has stayed the same for almost ten years and that same is very disturbing state of anarchy. >> ironically, congo has enormous national resources, is a beautiful, lush country, right? >> yeah, it's spectacular. it is really one of the most beautiful places i've been anywhere. just last week, there was a huge volcano with streams of smoke shooting out of it. it's very lush. it's very fertile. the lakes are beautiful. the environment is clean. it's blessed with mineral riches, gold, timber, copper. diamonds, just
. president clinton had said allowing genocide to happen in rwanda was one of his greatest failures in office. we know the president spent time with bill clinton recently. what is your sense how potent this is for president obama and whether or not he would take the step of taking out these facilities before this could happen? >> well i think we obviously known about the threat of syria's chemical weapons capability for a long time and this conflict has been going on now, getting close to two years. so we're a little bit late in the game to finally be worried about what might happen. in fact, there is actually a bigger risk in my view. it will be a tragedy if the weapons are used against the opposition in syria. but the potential for an even larger tragedy exists if the opposition gets hold of these chemical weapons, the terrorist elements in the opposition and sends them outside syria where they could be used by terrorists around the world. so the threat, although our immediate focus is the risk inside syria, i don't think we can ignore. i think america's focus ought to be the threat expandi
of the most beautiful modern housing communities in the world. it's a massive city. it's outside of rwanda, angola. the government had to build this to solve its housing shortage, but very few can actually afford to live there. cnn's dave mckenzie takes us inside a high-rise ghosttown. ♪ >> this is the promise of a new angola. the government propaganda video shows the scale of the new city. ♪ the chinese got. it's quite extraordinary. some five years ago there was absolutely nothing here. just bush. in that time they have schools and medical centers, kindergartens and tens of thousands of apartments. built using angola's oil credit lines with china. the final touches are still being made. but there are highways without cars. schools with no pupils. it feels like a ghosttown. we eventually found someone who had bought a flat. >> so you live in this apartment building? which -- where is your apartment? on the seventh floor. wow. and this building, is it completely filled? >> no, no. >> translator: no. we have through residents in this building. three apartments occupied. >> reporter: is
hurdle on the coleco rwanda would lead them to fight even if they lose damascus and as they put additional pressures on the unity of the syrian state and we certainly do not want to see the syrian state disintegrate. it goes back into this question of how to convince the community that it has a role in the future of syria like others in their doesn't have to be a genocide. i was struck by the editorial or an opinion piece in "the new york times" i think at the beginning of last week for the week before about the next genocide being against allowites, and that fear is present among the community members and so what you are talking about is just an extension of that and the way around it is the political solution the longer the violence goes on, the more extremist groups benefit and based on what we have seen of no sort of parent organization, al qaeda and iraqi will not be merciful at all so it is incumbent on us to bolster what in the political opposition which is what we are trying to do. >> thank you, ambassador woo-hoo when you say the regime is numbered is that proverbial or
statistics, things like political improvements and freedoms, this is really essential. countries like rwanda have been ranked no. 1. if you look around the markets, you will see the authority. 90% of the world's population. they're going to see improvements in those lives. there will be issues, but the story is very strong and that is why we are seeing the story being very positive. >> tell us about the frontier markets because you cite the story of capital labor productivity. it will explode very dramatically? >> i think there is a clear delineation between the advanced emerging economies and the frontier economies, but our related or integrated it is to the developed market, how much exposure do they have? in terms of trade and foreign direct investment, it is heavily dependent on the united states and europe. africa has 1 billion people and is less than 2% of world trade or direct investment. the real engine of growth is not going to be trade, unfortunately. if you look at valuations of the bank's and trading in the local market, the story is credible and hits to the story rather than be
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)